All Images In A Single View

With its new diagnostic reporting software for breast imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Siemens Healthcare provides radiologists with new opportunities in Women’s Health. The syngo BreVis diagnostic reporting software shows all of a patient’s examination results in a single view – for example ultrasound or radiography images next to the images from magnetic resonance imaging – impossible with previous technology. Additionally, the physician can use the new syngo BreVis Biopsy interventional software to plan and perform a biopsy when needed. It is almost fully automated and much faster than before. As such, this fast and efficient application represents a major advance for patients and users.

Given its high number of images, MR breast imaging is particularly challenging to diagnostic reporting software. Siemens faced this challenge with ongoing development and the implementation of new ideas. Its latest innovations in the area of MR breast imaging include the Magnetom Espree – Pink breast scanner, as well as a comprehensive range of applications specifically for MR breast imaging. These have now been enhanced by specialized syngo BreVis and syngo BreVis Biopsy software solutions. Syngo workplaces support both of these new solutions, which are computer-based diagnostic tools.

The syngo Brevis Workplace is a flexible hardware and software solution that is easy to use while simultaneously providing efficient diagnostic reporting. To establish a diagnosis, the physician can display ultrasound or radiography images in addition to magnetic resonance images, compare them, and process them individually, all on a single screen. The syngo Brevis Workplace enables almost fully automated reporting, elastic image correction of data should the patient move, color display of dynamic image information, and calculation of lesion volume. Diagnostic workflows are further optimized because the syngo Brevis diagnostic report is based on the BI-RADS classification. This Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) is a classification of breast lesions for diagnostic reporting accepted worldwide, and was created by the American College of Radiology (ACR).

The syngo Brevis Biopsy Workplace offers the physician an intuitive, fast, and precise means for planning and performing biopsies. The software automatically calculates the coordinates of the breast tissue to be removed. All components work together so that the intervention can be performed easier and faster than before, an advantage both to the patient and examining physician.

The new software solutions were developed by MeVis in close cooperation with Siemens. They are part of the Magnetom Espree – Pink dedicated MR breast scanner, but are also available for all other systems of the Magnetom family from Siemens. “In addition to the well-known high diagnostic reliability of our software applications, this specialized MRI solution is characterized by an unusually high clinical process efficiency,” said Dr. Carl J.G. Evertsz, CEO of MeVis Medical Solutions AG. “The new syngo BreVis diagnostic reporting software represents a major step toward real multi-modality diagnostics.”

Photos accompanying this press release are available under:
siemens/med-pictures/MR-Brevis

Source
Siemens Healthcare

AHIP Congratulates Senate On Passage Of SCHIP

Karen Ignagni, President and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), issued the following statement commending the U.S. Senate for voting to reauthorize and expand the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP):

“Strengthening the health care safety net is an essential component of comprehensive health care reform. The Senate took a critical step forward by voting to help ensure that no child falls through the cracks of our health care system. This legislation gives children access to essential health care services and eases the burden on working families who are struggling during the slowing economy. Policymakers should build on this momentum and pursue health care reform that gives every American access to high-quality, affordable health care coverage.”

Strengthening the health care safety net has been a central component of the comprehensive health care reform proposals AHIP began releasing in November 2006. For several years, AHIP has collaborated with a broad coalition of stakeholders in support of SCHIP reauthorization.

AHIP

Combined, Genes And Environment Affect Health More Than They Do Alone

Both nature and nurture — genetic makeup and the environment experienced through life — combine to influence health and well-being, Duke University Medical Center researchers and their colleagues have determined in four new studies. The researchers showed that people’s genes play a key role in how they respond both biologically and psychologically to stress in their environment.

The researchers presented four studies that examine genetics and the environment on Thursday, March 2, 2006, as part of a symposium organized by Duke researchers at the American Psychosomatic Society annual meeting in Denver. The studies were conducted at Vrije Universiteit in Holland, the Medical College of Georgia and Duke. The studies were funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute.

Two studies from Duke evaluated effects of a particular mutation in the gene that makes monoamine oxidase-A (MAOA-uVNTR), an enzyme responsible for breaking down serotonin as well as other neurotransmitters in the brain. One form of this mutation causes the gene to make more of the enzyme, while the other form results in less production of enzyme. Neurotransmitters are chemical signals by which one neuron triggers a nerve impulse in a neighbor. Thus, neurotransmitters are fundamentally responsible for all brain function, and subtle changes in their level or activity can profoundly affect not only brain function but physiological function influenced by the brain.

“There has been considerable speculation that serotonergic nerves in the brain play an important role in glucose metabolism and obesity,” said Richard Surwit, Ph.D., a medical psychologist at Duke who led one of the studies. “Drugs that block serotonergic receptors, such as olanzapine, can produce significant weight gain and diabetes, while drugs that stimulate serotonergic neurons, such as fenfluramine, can induce weight loss and improve metabolism.”

The researchers’ studies of the effects of mutations in MAOA-uVNTR in 84 people showed that having the active or inactive form of the MAOA-uVNTR mutation appeared to determine how serotonin affected blood levels of glucose and insulin, as well as body mass index.

“It appears that people who carry a particular form of this gene may be more susceptible to developing obesity and diabetes and may be more responsive to therapies that impact on this enzyme,” Surwit said.

In a separate study, a Duke research team examined effects of MAOA gene mutations in more than 300 study participants — half of whom were primary caregivers for relatives or spouses with Alzheimer’s disease and half who were similar to the caregivers but had no caregiving responsibilities. Their data show a significant effect of the MAOA gene on the levels of stress hormones, particularly in men.

“It appears that men with the less active form of the MAOA gene who were subjected to the stress of caregiving, exhausted their ability to mount a stress hormone response during the day and evening hours,” said Redford Williams, MD, director of the Behavioral Medicine Research Center at Duke and lead researcher on the study. “Their ability to maintain cortisol and adrenaline at normal levels during the day and evening was significantly lower than that of men with the more active form of the gene, and all the women with both forms of the gene.

“Ultimately, their body’s biological ability to cope with stress became impaired. This exhaustion of their ability to mount a hormonal stress response could place men with the less active form of the gene at higher risk of developing a broad range of health problems as their caregiving duties continue.”

The symposium also included a study at the Medical College of Georgia evaluating several families of genes known to affect the stress response and whether the genes affect the risk of developing hypertension, or high blood pressure.

“It has been difficult to show effects of stress on the development of hypertension because it may be that only a subset of people who show a genetic susceptibility will develop high blood pressure after chronic exposure to stress,” said Harold Snieder, Ph.D., lead investigator on the work being done at MCG. “Our research shows that effects of different candidate genes on the development of high blood pressure during adolescence depend on the environmental stressors that are present, the gender and the ethnicity, in a group of European American and African American youth that have been followed for 15 years.”

In another study reported in the symposium, Eco De Geus, Ph.D., of the Vrije Univeriteit tested blood pressure and heart rate reactivity to acute mental tasks in a sample of 372 adolescent and middle-aged twins. De Geus found that genetic factors had a bigger effect on reactivity to stress than on resting blood pressure.

“Some genes may lie dormant when life is sweet and calm, but swing into action when we are stressed,” he said.

The researchers at the symposium said they believe that using genetic markers to determine who is at greater risk of health problems due to both acute and chronic stress and other environmental factors — such as a high calorie diet — could help identify who might benefit from interventions, such as training in more effective coping strategies, or from closer monitoring for obesity and diabetes onset, the researchers said.

###

Contact: Tracey Koepke
koepk002mc.duke.edu
Duke University Medical Center

Bariatric Surgery In Diabetic Adults Improves Insulin Sensitivity Better Than Diet

Gastric bypass surgery improves Type 2 diabetes by other mechanisms in addition to weight loss and does so better than a low-calorie diet despite achieving equal weight loss, a new study finds. The results will be presented Monday at The Endocrine Society’s 92nd Annual Meeting in San Diego.

“Our study shows that in the short term, weight loss by diet alone does not achieve the same improvements in diabetes as gastric bypass surgery,” said the presenting author, Judith Korner, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

Korner and her colleagues found that gastric bypass surgery better improved insulin sensitivity, the body’s ability to successfully clear glucose sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Insulin sensitivity is impaired in people with Type 2 diabetes, and obesity adds to this problem. The result is a buildup of sugar in the blood.

The study compared the effects on diabetic adults of a low-calorie diet versus Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the most common gastric bypass procedure. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass decreases the size of the stomach and reroutes the digestive tract to bypass most of the stomach and part of the small intestine. After gastric bypass, many diabetic patients achieve normal blood glucose control or vastly improved control, and some may no longer require diabetes medications.

In the study, seven obese patients with Type 2 diabetes received a daily 800-calorie liquid diet and no surgery, while seven other obese diabetic adults underwent gastric bypass surgery. The study ended when both groups lost the same amount of weight: an average of 8 percent of body weight. However, the surgery-treated patients lost the weight faster: in about 3.5 weeks compared with 8 weeks for the dieters.

Surgical patients were able to discontinue all of their diabetes medications by the study’s end, but the dieters reduced their medication use by 55 percent, Korner reported.

The researchers found significant improvements in the surgery group in measures of insulin sensitivity and function of beta cells, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Improvements in insulin sensitivity in the low-calorie diet group was not statistically significant and beta cell function improved to a lesser extent.

Korner speculated that hormonal changes may be responsible for the improvements resulting from Roux-en-Y surgery in individuals with Type 2 diabetes.

“It will be important to understand how surgery works to produce these results so that we can develop medical therapies of equivalent efficacy,” she said.

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases funded this study.

Source:
Endocrine Society

Combating Weight Gain Caused By Antipsychotic Treatments

Antipsychotic drugs, such as olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal) and quetiapine (Seroquel), are commonly used to treat psychotic disorders like schizophrenia, but also bipolar disorder and even behavioral problems related to dementia. Unfortunately, the weight gain commonly experienced with antipsychotic treatment is an important side effect for many patients, and causes many patients to discontinue their use leading to even further problems. Biological Psychiatry, in its April 1st issue, is now publishing a new study that has evaluated an add-on treatment to potentially reduce treatment-associated weight gain.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, Dr. James Roerig and colleagues evaluated the effect of modafinil on olanzapine-associated weight gain in normal volunteer subjects. Modafinil is a drug currently used to increase wakefulness in individuals with sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy. All of the subjects received olanzapine, and half also received modafinil treatment while the other half instead received placebo. After three weeks, although the body mass index was increased in both groups, those receiving olanzapine/placebo showed significantly greater weight increase than those receiving olanzapine/modafinil.

Dr. Roerig notes that now that this short-term study in healthy individuals has shown promise, modafinil can now be evaluated as a “viable candidate for a larger, more complex clinical trial to determine efficacy in a patient population.”

Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry and affiliated with both Yale University School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, agrees that further research is warranted. “Psychiatrists are now working more closely with patients to manage the side effects of antipsychotic treatment. The finding that modafinil reduces weight gain may encourage more research to see whether there are other benefits associated with modafinil prescription with regards to symptoms or cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia.”

Elsevier
elsevier

View drug information on Risperdal Oral Formulation; Seroquel; Zyprexa.

Ancient Food Source Tested For Treating ALS

Nutritional supplementation with Spirulina, a nutrient-rich, blue-green algae, appeared to provide neuroprotective support for dying motor neurons in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, University of South Florida neuroscientists have found. Although more research is needed, they suggest that a spirulina-supplemented diet may provide clinical benefits for ALS patients.

A spirulina dietary supplement was shown to delay the onset of motor symptoms and disease progression, reducing inflammatory markers and motor neuron death in a G93A mouse model of ALS. Spirulina, an ancient food source used by the Aztecs, may have a dual antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on motor neurons, the researchers said.

Their study is published in the current issue of The Open Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Journal (3:36-41).

“ALS is a degenerative motor neuron disease,” said the study’s lead author, Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis, PhD, DSc, assistant professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair at USF. “Most available treatments relieve symptoms without altering the underlying disease. However, evidence for oxidative stress has been associated with ALS and, in our past studies, we demonstrated potent decreases in markers of oxidative damage and inflammation in aged rats fed diets supplemented with spirulina or spinach. In this initial study, the diet supplement was fed only to pre-symptomatic mice. Further studies showing the diet supplement’s effect on the lifespan of symptomatic ALS mice are needed to prove the treatment’s effectiveness.”

Specifically, when the USF researchers tested compounds found in blueberries and spirulina for effectiveness in animal models of stroke and aging in past experiments, they noted neuroprotective effects of the nutritional supplements.

The current study compared ALS mice receiving a spirulina-supplemented diet over a 10-week period with mice that did not receive the diet supplementation. The spirulina-fed ALS mice showed reduced inflammatory markers and motor neuron degeneration over that period.

“The focus of our future ALS experiments will include motor neuron counts and an examination of lifespan following dietary spirulina supplementation in symptomatic ALS mice,” said study co-author Paula C. Bickford, PhD, a professor in the USF Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair and a senior research biologist at the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital in Tampa, Florida.

Source:
Randolph Fillmore
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Breakthrough In The Search For New Treatments For MS

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have discovered a molecular mechanism which could bring about the development of new treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system.

Dr Bruno Gran, a Clinical Associate Professor in the Division of Clinical Neurology in the School of Clinical Sciences, working in collaboration with Professor Paul Moynagh from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, has discovered a synthetic chemical compound which inhibits the pro-inflammatory signals produced by the immune system in MS. What makes this chemical unique is that at the same time, it stimulates the body to produce interferon-beta, an anti-inflammatory molecule, that is commonly given to patients as an injected drug to treat MS.

Together, these effects cause significant reduction in the severity of an animal model of MS. The researchers have also discovered that cells of the immune system obtained from the blood of people with MS are more sensitive to the effects of this drug than those obtained from people who do not have MS.

Dr Gran said: “Under laboratory conditions we have found a way of encouraging the body to produce its own Interferon-beta. When other experimental substances have been tested in the laboratory to achieve this effect, they usually cause the immune system to produce a mixture of anti-inflammatory as well as pro-inflammatory molecules, typically reducing the overall efficacy. In the case of the compound tested in this study (a synthetic cannabinoid known as R(+)WIN55,212-2), the predominantly anti-inflammatory effects appear promising for further pre-clinical, and hopefully clinical, testing.

With no available cure MS is the focus of intense study for the hundreds of scientists across the world who are working on new treatments for this disabling disease. MS is more common in temperate climates. With around 100,000 people suffering from MS in the UK the country has one of the highest rates of the disease in the world.

Until 20 years ago there was little progress in the search for treatments.

After their first approval in 1993 Beta Interferons still represent one of the first line treatments for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. These drugs are not a cure but they can reduce the number and severity of relapses. Despite this, more effective, well tolerated therapeutic strategies are needed.

Dr Gran’s research, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, continues a line of investigation which his laboratory has carried out for a number of years on the role of endogenous type I interferons in regulating multiple sclerosis inflammation in the central nervous system.

The cause of MS is still something of a mystery. Numerous factors are thought to contribute, including genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The latter are thought to include certain viral infections and low levels of vitamin D, linked to poor sun exposure.

These latest findings highlight a new selective mechanism that may be open to exploitation in the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of MS.

Sources: Nottingham University, AlphaGalileo Foundation.

Chronic Marijuana Smoking Affects Brain Chemistry

Definitive proof of an adverse effect of chronic marijuana use revealed at SNM’s 58th Annual Meeting could lead to potential drug treatments and aid other research involved in cannabinoid receptors, a neurotransmission system receiving a lot of attention. Scientists used molecular imaging to visualize changes in the brains of heavy marijuana smokers versus non-smokers and found that abuse of the drug led to a decreased number of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, which are involved in not just pleasure, appetite and pain tolerance but a host of other psychological and physiological functions of the body.

“Addictions are a major medical and socioeconomic problem,” says Jussi Hirvonen, MD, PhD, lead author of the collaborative study between the National Institute of Mental Health and National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Md. “Unfortunately, we do not fully understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in addiction. With this study, we were able to show for the first time that people who abuse cannabis have abnormalities of the cannabinoid receptors in the brain. This information may prove critical for the development of novel treatments for cannabis abuse. Furthermore, this research shows that the decreased receptors in people who abuse cannabis return to normal when they stop smoking the drug.”

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, marijuana is the number-one illicit drug of choice in America. The psychoactive chemical in marijuana, or cannabis, is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which binds to numerous cannabinoid receptors in the brain and throughout the body when smoked or ingested, producing a distinctive high. Cannabinoid receptors in the brain influence a range of mental states and actions, including pleasure, concentration, perception of time and memory, sensory perception, and coordination of movement. There are also cannabinoid receptors throughout the body involved in a wide range of functions of the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory and other systems of the body. Currently two subtypes of cannabinoid receptors are known, CB1 and CB2, the former being involved mostly in functions of the central nervous system and the latter more in functions of the immune system and in stem cells of the circulatory system.

For this study, researchers recruited 30 chronic daily cannabis smokers who were then monitored at a closed inpatient facility for approximately four weeks. The subjects were imaged using positron emission tomography (PET), which provides information about physiological processes in the body. Subjects were injected with a radioligand, 18F-FMPEP-d2, which is a combination of a radioactive fluorine isotope and a neurotransmitter analog that binds with CB1 brain receptors.

Results of the study show that receptor number was decreased about 20 percent in brains of cannabis smokers when compared to healthy control subjects with limited exposure to cannabis during their lifetime. These changes were found to have a correlation with the number of years subjects had smoked. Of the original 30 cannabis smokers, 14 of the subjects underwent a second PET scan after about a month of abstinence. There was a marked increase in receptor activity in those areas that had been decreased at the outset of the study, an indication that while chronic cannabis smoking causes downregulation of CB1 receptors, the damage is reversible with abstinence.

Information gleaned from this and future studies may help other research exploring the role of PET imaging of CB1 receptors – not just for drug use, but also for a range of human diseases, including metabolic disease and cancer.

Notes:

Scientific Paper 10: J. Hirvonen, R. Goodwin, C. Li1, G. Terry, S. Zoghbi, C Morse, V. Pike, N. Volkow, M. Huestis, R. Innis, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD; National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD; “Reversible and regionally selective downregulation of brain cannabinoid CB1 receptors in chronic daily cannabis smokers,” SNM’s 58th Annual Meeting, June 4-8, 2011, San Antonio, TX.

Source:
Susan Martonik

Society of Nuclear Medicine

3 Payloads Built By CU-Boulder Set For Launch On Space Shuttle Atlantis

NASA’s space shuttle Atlantis will make its final flight May 14 carrying three University of Colorado at Boulder-built biomedical payload devices, including one to help scientists understand how and why slimy and troublesome clumps of microorganisms flourish in the low-gravity conditions of space.

The experiments on biofilms — clusters of microorganisms that adhere to each other or to various surfaces — are of high interest to space scientists because of their potential impacts on astronaut and spacecraft health, said CU-Boulder’s Louis Stodieck, director of BioServe Space Technologies in the aerospace engineering sciences department. Their growth, for example, occurred in water purification and environmental controls systems on Russia’s Mir Space Station and was of regular concern.

Led by Professor Cynthia Collins of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., and managed by NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, Calif., the experiments will target the growth, physiology and cell-to-cell interactions in microbial biofilms. The team will examine how the formation of the three-dimensional structure of biofilms formed by microbes differs in spaceflight versus normal gravity.

Because astronauts show decreases in their immune systems during spaceflight, researchers would like to know more about how bacteria behave in space, including their apparent increase in virulence and resistance to antibiotics, said Stodieck. Such experiments have implications for astronauts on long-term space travel flight to places like the moon, Mars and beyond.

The experiments will be carried aboard Atlantis in sets of specially designed fluid-processing apparatuses known as GAPs designed and built by BioServe, said Stodieck. Atlantis astronauts will control the individual GAP experiments using hand cranks to trigger and then later terminate cell growth via fluid mixing. The samples will be returned to Earth at the end of the mission for further study.

The GAPs will ride inside BioServe’s Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus, an automated, suitcase-sized device developed at CU-Boulder that has been launched on more than a dozen NASA space shuttle missions, with two of the CGBA devices now on the International Space Station. BioServe is providing the hardware, integration and operations support for all Atlantis GAP experiments.

A second experiment using BioServe hardware, sponsored by Astrogenetix, Inc. headquartered in Austin, Tex., and designed by researchers at the Durham VA Medical Center in North Carolina will analyze changes in virulence of two particularly nasty strains of bacteria in the low gravity of space. One, Salmonella, can cause illness and death to humans by tainting food or water. The second, Staphylococcus, can cause a variety of infections, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA — a growing problem in hospitals and health clinics — because of its ability to resist antibiotics in the penicillin class of drugs.

“Water quality, food safety and disease are age-old problems on Earth,” said Stodieck. Not only do these experiments have applications for keeping crew members safe by helping scientists better understand gene and protein changes in pathogens, they also could help researchers find new ways to prevent and control infectious disease.”

A third experiment designed by the University of Florida will use BioServe hardware to study cell cultivation in a tropical plant known as Jatropha that produces energy-rich nuts, a popular new renewable crop for biofuels. The researchers will be looking for genes that help or hinder growth in tropical plant species to see if it could be commercially grown in “warm-temperate” areas like the southern United States.

After the launch of Atlantis, the shuttle program has two scheduled flights remaining — Discovery September and Endeavour in November — before the fleet is retired. Stodieck said hardware and experiments built by BioServe are manifested on both missions as well as on future resupply vehicles traveling to the International Space Station from other countries. BioServe also has plans to fly hardware and experiments in micro-gravity on existing commercial rockets and on space vehicles now under development, Stodieck said.

“It’s been quite an era for the space shuttle program,” said Stodieck. “But I fully expect we will continue to do research on the International Space Station – it will just require an adjustment in space vehicles.”

Both undergraduate and graduate students play a role in designing, building and testing spaceflight payloads, said Stodieck. Master’s student Christine Fanchiang, who has helped to test the payloads, will be at Cape Kennedy, Fla., for the launch.

“I had heard there were astronauts on the CU faculty, and then I found out that I could actually work with real spaceflight hardware at BioServe,” Fanchiang said. “I plan on getting my doctorate here in aerospace engineering, and who knows — maybe someday I can help to design and build lunar outposts.”

BioServe also has flown several K-12 educational experiments on ISS, including seed-germination studies, crystal garden growth experiments and the life cycles of butterflies — all of which have provided learning opportunities for middle school and high school students around the world, said Stefanie Countryman. Countryman is BioServe’s business manager and coordinator of education outreach.

Source:
Louis Stodieck
University of Colorado at Boulder

Competitive Technologies Announces Publication Of Positive Test Results For Memory Improvement Technology

Competitive Technologies, Inc. (AMEX: CTT) announced the publication in August of an article in the Vol. 3, No. 2, 2007 issue of the International Journal of Learning Technology (IJLT) citing the positive results in the double-blind testing of the efficacy of the MC Square device for improving verbal memory, learning and attention. Test results showed statistically reliable improvement in the measure of attention/concentration following training with the MC Square. CTT has U.S. distribution rights for the patent-pending technology licensed by Thomas Jefferson University of Philadelphia (Jefferson), to Seoul, Korea-based Daeyang E&C, Inc. (KOSDAQ: 033030).

The original device, created in Korea, designed to provide stress relief, improved concentration and relaxation, and as a learning aid, has sold over 1.2 million units. Researchers at Jefferson, under the direction of Neuropsychologist Joseph I. Tracy, Ph.D, associate professor of Neurology and Radiology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, and Director, Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging Laboratory Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, tested the Jefferson-modified device for improvement of attention and concentration.

The MC Square uses Audio-Visual Stimulation through synchronized sound and light rhythms to influence brain activity. Based upon the results of rigorous testing, as detailed in the IJLT article, A test of the efficacy of the MC Square device for improving verbal memory, learning and attention, Jefferson’s researchers and Daeyang E&C jointly filed a patent to utilize the improved MC Square device as a method of treatment for age-related memory loss. Under the licensing agreement, Daeyang is granted exclusive commercial rights to the technology.

IJLT, published by Inderscience (inderscience/ijlt), is an international, refereed journal providing a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary forum for the presentation of articles regarding the role of learning technologies in learning and instruction. Articles focus on the study of knowledge and learning vis-Г -vis instruction and the technologies and tools that support the process.

Based on the patent-pending treatment method, the MC Square target market has been expanded from students to include normal, healthy individuals that report, or are at risk of, mild memory loss. CTT is targeting this large growing segment of the US population with marketing and distribution plans for MC Square that focus on user experience with the device.

The Alzheimer’s Association (alz) estimates that risk and costs associated with age-related memory loss contribute to the estimated costs for Alzheimer’s and other dementias of $148 billion annually. Alzheimer’s is a progressive, degenerative disease that alters the brain, causing impaired memory, thinking and behavior. It is estimated that nearly 13% or 4.9 million people age 65 and over have Alzheimer’s, and that by 2050 the number of Americans with this disease could range from 11 to 16 million unless a way is found to prevent or effectively treat this disease.

About Thomas Jefferson University

Thomas Jefferson University, based in Philadelphia, PA, is an academic health center consisting of Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies, Jefferson College of Health Professions and associated university services. Dedicated to the health sciences, Jefferson educates professionals in a variety of disciplines to form and lead the integrated healthcare delivery and research teams of tomorrow; discovers new knowledge that will define the future of clinical care through investigation from the laboratory to the bedside, and into the community; and sets the standard for quality, compassionate and efficient patient care for their community and for the nation. Jefferson accomplishes its mission in partnership with Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, its education and clinical care affiliate. Visit Jefferson’s website: jefferson.edu

About Daeyang E&C

Daeyang E&C, founded in 1979, is a publicly traded company in Korea (KOSDAQ: 03303) with a market capitalization of $200 million. With a stated corporate philosophy of “Customer success is equivalent to corporate success,” Daeyang is the market leader in its unique product segments. To fulfill the company’s principle of returning profit to its customers, Daeyang created the MC Square Scholarship in 1993 with over 1,600 scholarships granted to date. Daeyang manufactures and markets a neuroscience device for increasing study efficiency called MC Square that has been established as a strong consumer brand name in Korea. Daeyang E&C accesses multiple business fields, especially in the IT and biotechnology industries, through the resources available from its affiliate Daeyang Venture Capital Ltd., also of Korea. Daeyang develops these VC business lines in health-related fields based on neuroscience technologies. Visit Daeyang’s website: daeyangenc

About Competitive Technologies, Inc.

Competitive Technologies, established in 1968, is a full service technology transfer and licensing provider focused on the technology needs of its customers and transforming those requirements into commercially viable solutions. CTT is a global leader in identifying, developing and commercializing innovative technologies in life, electronic, nano, and physical sciences developed by universities, companies and inventors. CTT maximizes the value of intellectual assets for the benefit of its customers, clients and shareholders. Visit CTT’s website: competitivetech

Statements about our future expectations are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of applicable Federal Securities Laws, and are not guarantees of future performance. When used herein, the words “may,” “will,” “should,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “appear,” “intend,” “plan,” “expect,” “estimate,” “approximate,” and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These statements involve risks and uncertainties inherent in our business, including those set forth in Item 1A under the caption “Risk Factors,” in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2006, filed with the SEC on October 30, 2006, and other filings with the SEC, and are subject to change at any time. Our actual results could differ materially from these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statement.

competitivetech